There are around 1.2 million illegal, and 500,000 legal, migrant workers in the kingdom.[237] Thousands of foreign women, mostly from the Middle East and Eastern Europe, work in nightclubs, hotels and bars across the kingdom.[238][239][240] American and European expatriate communities are concentrated in the capital, as the city is home to many international organizations and diplomatic missions.[196]


Although Jordan is a very hospitable country to foreigners, the fact that there's a lot of tourism and that the nation is very much westernized has rendered natives somewhat indifferent to tourists. Although this is an Arabic country, in practice you will feel (especially in Amman) like it is Europe. Natives are friendly, however do not expect the overwhelming welcome you might see in Egypt, Yemen or Oman.
This isn't your average blog. I don't take Pinterest-perfect pictures. I don't have a crafty bone in my body. I'm a horrible cook. In fact, if you're looking for any form of perfection, you won't find it here. I don't concentrate too hard on the blogging tricks (i.e. my posts are always waaay too long. Sorry, it's a sickness, really.), and my ultimate goal is to have my own TV show someday. I keep it down-home, back-woods, take-it-or-leave-it for REALSIES on this blog. Oh, and I definitely recommend reading the truth about how my blog makes money to better understand how things work over here.
The Zarqa Private University has a more open space than Amman. Its Arabic courses are very good due to the fact that the communication teacher only speaks Arabic and the other teacher teaches the rules and pronunciation in English. The complete Arabic learning course is 10 months. There are 3 levels. -1st level costs JOD500 for the first 4 months. -(3 weeks break during summer). -2nd level cost JOD300 for next 2 months. -3rd level cost JOD500 for the last 4 months
Nike owns none of the factories where Air Jordans are produced and contracts the work to various factory owners. Company officials say that they only design and market the shoes. However, Nike dictates production terms and standards to the contractor, often without questioning labor or safety practices. In April 1997, 10,000 Indonesian workers went on strike over wage violations at an Air Jordan factory. The same month in Vietnam 1,300 workers went on strike demanding a 1-cent-per-hour raise, and a year later in 1998, 3,000 workers in China went on strike to protest hazardous working conditions and low wages cause.[38]
Jordan's economy is relatively well diversified. Trade and finance combined account for nearly one-third of GDP; transportation and communication, public utilities, and construction account for one-fifth, and mining and manufacturing constitute nearly another fifth. Despite plans to expand the private sector, the state remains the dominant force in Jordan's economy.[16] Net official development assistance to Jordan in 2009 totalled USD 761 million; according to the government, approximately two-thirds of this was allocated as grants, of which half was direct budget support.[172]

The shoe was designed by Air Jordan Senior Footwear Designer, Tate Kuerbis, a person that had been part of the Jordan footwear design team since 1999 and with Nike since 1995. The inspiration for the design came from a number of things; sleek racing lines of the auto world, carbon fibre-based monocoque of F1 race cars, race car driving shoes (rubber heel wrap) and Fine Italian dress shoes (bold stitching on the soles).
Getting to the border: Buses from Jerusalem (central bus station) run hourly from Beit She’an (about 7km from the border), take around 2 hours to reach the border and cost NIS42. Ask for bus 961 or 966. The buses are large, comfortable buses with free Wi-Fi and lots of room for luggage. Toward the end of the route the bus passes through a checkpoint so have passports handy. Expect to see Israeli armed personnel on the buses travelling to their posts. A taxi from Beit She’an to the border costs NIS5-10 and taxis usually wait outside the bus stop.

For breakfast, the traditional breakfast is usually fried eggs, labaneh, cheese, zaatar and olive oil along with bread and a cup of tea. Falafel and hummus are eaten on the weekends by some and more often by others. There's no convention for when you should or should not eat any type of food. It's up to you. This is the most popular breakfast. Manousheh and pastries come in as the second most popular breakfast item. All of the hotels offer American breakfast.
The tourism sector is considered a cornerstone of the economy, being a large source of employment, hard currency and economic growth. In 2010, there were 8 million visitors to Jordan. The majority of tourists coming to Jordan are from European and Arab countries.[15] The tourism sector in Jordan has been severely affected by regional turbulence.[190] The most recent blow to the tourism sector was caused by the Arab Spring, which scared off tourists from the entire region. Jordan experienced a 70% decrease in the number of tourists from 2010 to 2016.[191] Tourist numbers started to recover as of 2017.[191]
The Air Jordan III was designed by Tinker Hatfield who works for Nike as a designer for stores and offices. By that time Michael Jordan was ready to leave Nike, but the Jordan III changed his mind. It was the first Air Jordan to feature a visible air unit on the heel, the new Jumpman logo, an elephant print trim and tumble leather to give it a luxury look. The Air Jordan III was also famous for the humorous ads depicting film director Spike Lee as Mars Blackmon, the character he played in his film She's Gotta Have It. This campaign was known as the "Mars and Mike" ad campaign, which was one of Nike's most successful advertisement campaigns. These were the first Jordans to feature the "NIKE AIR" logo on the back, but later replaced by the Jumpman logo, with the words "AIR" underneath it, similar to the Air Jordan VI. These were said to be Michael Jordan's favorite shoes, he wore them during the 1988 NBA Slam Dunk Contest and many other events in his basketball career. The Air Jordan III's had poor sales when first reintroduced in 1994. On their second reintroduction in 2001, they sold well. The "Fire Red" Air Jordan III was released in March 2007, and late again in 2013.
The last functioning part of the famous Hejaz Railway, twice-weekly trains used to arrive from Damascus (Syria) at Amman's Mahatta junction just north-east of the downtown area, close to Marka Airport. However, services have been suspended since mid-2006 due to damage to the tracks, and it's unclear when they will resume. Even when they were running, trains took a very leisurely 9 hours (considerably slower than driving), and provided a very low standard of comfort. There are no other passenger trains in Jordan.
The base of the each mid-sole has stylized text that when combined reads: "I've failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed." This quote was originally attributed to Michael Jordan, and is a reference to an advertising campaign that aired in 1997 with Jordan detailing his failures that led to his success in his career.

The tourism sector is considered a cornerstone of the economy, being a large source of employment, hard currency and economic growth. In 2010, there were 8 million visitors to Jordan. The majority of tourists coming to Jordan are from European and Arab countries.[15] The tourism sector in Jordan has been severely affected by regional turbulence.[190] The most recent blow to the tourism sector was caused by the Arab Spring, which scared off tourists from the entire region. Jordan experienced a 70% decrease in the number of tourists from 2010 to 2016.[191] Tourist numbers started to recover as of 2017.[191]
The Great Recession and the turmoil caused by the Arab Spring have depressed Jordan's GDP growth, damaging trade, industry, construction and tourism.[17] Tourist arrivals have dropped sharply since 2011.[176] Since 2011, the natural gas pipeline in Sinai supplying Jordan from Egypt was attacked 32 times by Islamic State affiliates. Jordan incurred billions of dollars in losses because it had to substitute more expensive heavy-fuel oils to generate electricity.[177] In November 2012, the government cut subsidies on fuel, increasing its price.[178] The decision, which was later revoked, caused large scale protests to break out across the country.[175][176]
The Air Jordan XX9, also designed by Hatfield, released in September 2014 in both an elephant print and a knit edition. The shoe has already been debuted in the NBA by Russell Westbrook and Kawhi Leonard. The shoe has Flight Web for superior lockdown, a performance woven upper for comfort, support, strength, and protection, and a re-engineered Flight Plate. The XX9 also released in a pack alongside the iconic Air Jordan XI on December 23, 2014 called the "Ultimate Gift of Flight" pack.[20]
The Air Jordan XX2/XXII shoe model, designed by D'Wayne Edwards, was released on March 24, 2007. The original retail price of the model was US$175. The aggressive and sharp design was inspired by the F-22 Raptor fighter jet. Some technical features of the shoe include an updated visible and interchangeable I.P.S. suspension system, a new metallic mesh for ventilation, the Air Jordan camouflage pattern printed in reflective 3M material, and an updated traction system, based on an army general's stripes.
These Transjordanian kingdoms were in continuous conflict with the neighbouring Hebrew kingdoms of Israel and Judah, centered west of the Jordan River–though the former was known to have at times controlled small parts east of the river.[34] One record of this is the Mesha Stele erected by the Moabite king Mesha in 840 BC on which he lauds himself for the building projects that he initiated in Moab and commemorates his glory and victory against the Israelites.[35] The stele constitutes one of the most important direct accounts of Biblical history.[36] Around 700 BC, the kingdoms benefited from trade between Syria and Arabia when the Assyrian Empire controlled the Levant.[37] Babylonians took over the empire after its disintegration in 627 BC.[37] Although the kingdoms supported the Babylonians against Judah in the 597 BC sack of Jerusalem, they rebelled against them a decade later.[37] The kingdoms were reduced to vassals, and they remained to be so under the Persian and Hellenic Empires.[37] However, by the time of Roman rule around 63 BC, Ammon, Edom and Moab had lost their distinct identities, and were assimilated into Roman culture.[33]
As in all urban areas in the world, Jordan's cities have some health concerns but also keep in mind that Jordan is a centre for medical treatment in the Middle East and its world-class hospitals are respected in every part of the world. Just remember to have caution with buying food from vendors, the vendors aren't trying to hurt you but the food might be unclean. Hospitals in Jordan, especially Amman, are abundant. Jordan is a hub for medical tourism. Also, the biggest risk to your health in Jordan is probably being involved in a road traffic accident.
The largest museum in Jordan is The Jordan Museum. It contains much of the valuable archaeological findings in the country, including some of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Neolithic limestone statues of 'Ain Ghazal and a copy of the Mesha Stele.[261] Most museums in Jordan are located in Amman including The Children's Museum Jordan, The Martyr's Memorial and Museum and the Royal Automobile Museum. Museums outside Amman include the Aqaba Archaeological Museum.[262] The Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts is a major contemporary art museum located in Amman.[262]
Yitzhak Rabin/Arava border Crossing into Jordan from Eilat (Israel) is FREE of charge because you are entering a special economic Zone the ASEZ (Aqaba Special Economic Zone). A Visa will be granted depending on your nationality. Most EU members will either get 2 weeks or even 1 month of free visa (Israeli Citizens most likely will get 2 weeks). For further information check http://www.your-guide-to-aqaba-jordan.com/visa_to_jordan.html
According to Freedom House, Jordan is ranked as the 3rd freest Arab country, and as "partly free" in the Freedom in the World 2018 report.[143] The 2010 Arab Democracy Index from the Arab Reform Initiative ranked Jordan first in the state of democratic reforms out of 15 Arab countries.[144] Jordan ranked first among the Arab states and 78th globally in the Human Freedom Index in 2015,[145] and ranked 55th out of 175 countries in the Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) issued by Transparency International in 2014, where 175th is most corrupt.[146] In the 2016 Press Freedom Index maintained by Reporters Without Borders, Jordan ranked 135th out of 180 countries worldwide, and 5th of 19 countries in the Middle East and North Africa region. Jordan's score was 44 on a scale from 0 (most free) to 105 (least free). The report added "the Arab Spring and the Syrian conflict have led the authorities to tighten their grip on the media and, in particular, the Internet, despite an outcry from civil society".[147] Jordanian media consists of public and private institutions. Popular Jordanian newspapers include Al Ghad and the Jordan Times. The two most-watched local TV stations are Ro'ya TV and Jordan TV.[148] Internet penetration in Jordan reached 76% in 2015.[149]
Jordan signed a military pact with Egypt just before Israel launched a preemptive strike on Egypt to begin the Six-Day War in June 1967, where Jordan and Syria joined the war.[102] The Arab states were defeated and Jordan lost control of the West Bank to Israel.[102] The War of Attrition with Israel followed, which included the 1968 Battle of Karameh where the combined forces of the Jordanian Armed Forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) repelled an Israeli attack on the Karameh camp on the Jordanian border with the West Bank.[102] Despite the fact that the Palestinians had limited involvement against the Israeli forces, the events at Karameh gained wide recognition and acclaim in the Arab world.[103] As a result, the time period following the battle witnessed an upsurge of support for Palestinian paramilitary elements (the fedayeen) within Jordan from other Arab countries.[103] The fedayeen activities soon became a threat to Jordan's rule of law.[103] In September 1970, the Jordanian army targeted the fedayeen and the resultant fighting led to the expulsion of Palestinian fighters from various PLO groups into Lebanon, in a civil war that became known as Black September.[103]
The Air Jordan 1 was first produced for Michael Jordan in 1984. It was designed by Peter C. Moore.[3] The red and black colorway of the Nike Air Ship, the prototype for the Jordan 1, was later outlawed by NBA Commissioner David Stern for having very little white on them (this rule, known as the '51 percent' rule, was repealed in the late 2000s decade[4]).[5] It is a common misconception that the Jordan 1 was banned however, it was indeed the Nike Air Ship. After the Nike Air Ship was banned, Michael Jordan and Nike introduced the Jordan 1 in color ways with more white such as the "Chicago" color way and the "Black Toe" color way. They used the Nike Air Ship's banning as a promotional tool in advertisements hinting that the shoes gave an unfair competitive advantage for the Jordan 1 and that whoever wore them had a certain edginess associated with outlaw activities. Fragment x Jordan 1's: Staying true to the original Air Jordan, the remastered design features an all-over, premium leather execution with black overlays, blue accents, and Fragment insignia. The Air Jordan I was originally released on the market from 1985 to 1986, with re-releases (known as "retros") in 1994, 2001–2004, and 2007–2018.
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