Jordan's total foreign debt in 2011 was $19 billion, representing 60% of its GDP. In 2016, the debt reached $35.1 billion representing 93% of its GDP.[106] This substantial increase is attributed to effects of regional instability causing: decrease in tourist activity; decreased foreign investments; increased military expenditure; attacks on Egyptian pipeline; the collapse of trade with Iraq and Syria; expenses from hosting Syrian refugees and accumulated interests from loans.[106] According to the World Bank, Syrian refugees have cost Jordan more than $2.5 billion a year, amounting to 6% of the GDP and 25% of the government's annual revenue.[179] Foreign aid covers only a small part of these costs, 63% of the total costs are covered by Jordan.[180] An austerity programme was adopted by the government which aims to reduce Jordan's debt-to-GDP ratio to 77 percent by 2021.[181] The programme succeeded in preventing the debt from rising above 95% in 2018.[182]
Queen Alia International Airport (QAIA) is the country's main airport. A state-of-the-art new terminal was inaugurated in March 2013 to replace the airport's older two passenger terminals and one cargo terminal, the total number of passengers served by QAIA in 2014 was 7,089,008. It is 35km south of Amman (on the main route to Aqaba). You should allow 45 minutes to reach the airport from the downtown Amman, approximately 30 minutes from West Amman. Transport into Amman is provided by the Royal Jordanian bus service to the city terminal near the 7th circle, or by taxi (around JOD20 - 30, fixed tariff depending on area). Ride-hailing services like Uber are aggressively prosecuted, cars impounded, but pirate taxis run the lot at the same price. In addition to Queen Alia, Jordan has two other international airports:
The Zarqa Private University has a more open space than Amman. Its Arabic courses are very good due to the fact that the communication teacher only speaks Arabic and the other teacher teaches the rules and pronunciation in English. The complete Arabic learning course is 10 months. There are 3 levels. -1st level costs JOD500 for the first 4 months. -(3 weeks break during summer). -2nd level cost JOD300 for next 2 months. -3rd level cost JOD500 for the last 4 months

The official language is Modern Standard Arabic, a literary language taught in the schools.[254] Most Jordanians natively speak one of the non-standard Arabic dialects known as Jordanian Arabic. Jordanian Sign Language is the language of the deaf community. English, though without official status, is widely spoken throughout the country and is the de facto language of commerce and banking, as well as a co-official status in the education sector; almost all university-level classes are held in English and almost all public schools teach English along with Standard Arabic.[254] Chechen, Circassian, Armenian, Tagalog, and Russian are popular among their communities.[255] French is offered as an elective in many schools, mainly in the private sector.[254] German is an increasingly popular language; it has been introduced at a larger scale since the establishment of the German-Jordanian University in 2005.[256]


Over 2,000 plant species have been recorded in Jordan.[118] Many of the flowering plants bloom in the spring after the winter rains and the type of vegetation depends largely on the levels of precipitation. The mountainous regions in the northwest are clothed in forests, while further south and east the vegetation becomes more scrubby and transitions to steppe-type vegetation.[119] Forests cover 1.5 million dunums (1,500 km2), less than 2% of Jordan, making Jordan among the world's least forested countries, the international average being 15%.[120]
In Petra, Nawwaf's Kitchen (a stone's throw from the Little Petra site), is possibly the only home kitchen in the country that has opened up to foodies. Run by maestro of Bedouin cuisine, Nawwaf Hwatats, it's a humble and cheap drop-in place that also caters for large groups. Do warn him you are coming though! +962 776 882 309 / email: [email protected] / Website: http://www.nabataeantours.com/about-me/nawwaf-s-kitchen
Holders of confirmed onward tickets may stay in transit at Gold Coast Airport or any other international airport in Australia without a visa for a maximum time of 2 hours as long as they are arriving and departing on the same aircraft (excluding Gold Coast Airport). Holders of confirmed onward tickets may also stay in transit without a visa at any international airport in Australia (except for Gold Coast Airport) for a maximum time of 8 hours.[31]
Alexander the Great's conquest of the Persian Empire in 332 BC introduced Hellenistic culture to the Middle East.[38] After Alexander's death in 323 BC, the empire split among his generals, and in the end much of Transjordan was disputed between the Ptolemies based in Egypt and the Seleucids based in Syria.[38] The Nabataeans, nomadic Arabs based south of Edom, managed to establish an independent kingdom in 169 BC by exploiting the struggle between the two Greek powers.[38] The Nabataean Kingdom controlled much of the trade routes of the region, and it stretched south along the Red Sea coast into the Hejaz desert, up to as far north as Damascus, which it controlled for a short period (85–71) BC.[39] The Nabataeans massed a fortune from their control of the trade routes, often drawing the envy of their neighbors.[40] Petra, Nabataea's barren capital, flourished in the 1st century AD, driven by its extensive water irrigation systems and agriculture.[41] The Nabataeans were also talented stone carvers, building their most elaborate structure, Al-Khazneh, in the first century AD.[42] It is believed to be the mausoleum of the Arab Nabataean King Aretas IV.[42]
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Travelling by taxi from Aqaba (Jordan) via Eliat (Israel) to Taba (Egypt), then taking a bus or shared taxi to southern Sinai is generally faster than taking the boat because of wait times at before the ferry departs and upon ferry arrival. Because of the high ferry costs, two travellers crossing by ground together will save money over taking the ferry. Note that within Israel, there is an Egged bus that operates from Eliat to the Egyptian border crossing, but a taxi is required between Eliat and the Jordanian border crossing. Remember to ask that Israeli customs do not to stamp the passport when entering and exiting Israel.
Jordan takes its name from the Jordan River which forms much of the country's northwestern border.[17] While several theories for the origin of the river's name have been proposed, it is most plausible that it derives from the Semitic word Yarad, meaning "the descender", reflecting the river's declivity.[18] Much of the area that makes up modern Jordan was historically called Transjordan, meaning "across the Jordan", used to denote the lands east of the river.[18] The Hebrew Bible refers to the area as "the other side of the Jordan".[18] Early Arab chronicles referred to the river as Al-Urdunn, corresponding to the Semitic Yarden.[19] Jund Al-Urdunn was a military district around the river in the early Islamic era.[19] Later, during the Crusades in the beginning of the second millennium, a lordship was established in the area under the name of Oultrejordain.[20]
The Jordan Brand released their second two-pair package named the "Old Love New Love" (OLNL), which consisted of the Air Jordan I Retro model in Mid White/Black-Varsity Red (Black Toes) and Black/Varsity-Maize/White. It was released on April 21, 2007. The Old Love New Love package was sold for $200.00. The pack represented Jordan's passions, the old love being basketball the new love being motorcycle racing.[28]
After years of running a successful blog, being featured on incredible shows, in magazines, selling out of basically every conference and class I throw, I finally decided to listen to my Freebs and give them what they wanted – a program with ALL my best information, in ONE PLACE, that is EASY to follow, and FUN to use. I committed that this would be the year! After months of all-nighters, lots of caffeine, and over 16 straight hours in front of a camera, reading a teleprompter until my eyes hurt, Budget Boot Camp is now born and I couldn’t be more excited about it! Stay tuned too, this is only the beginning; it’s only going to get bigger, better, and more amazing from here on out!
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